Tuesday, 14 July 2020

Book Chapter: Access to Land and Food Security: Analysis of ‘Priority Crops’ Production in Ogun State, Nigeria

Abstract:

Using Ogun State located in South-western Nigeria, this chapter draws attention to the increase in output productivity of priority crops in the State from 2003 to 2015 due to the acquisitions of over 47,334 hectares of agricultural land across 28 communities in different Local Government Areas (LGAs). From Ogun State Agriculture Data, eight priority crops are analyzed: cassava, maize, rice, melon, yam, cocoyam, potato, and cowpea. Statistics reveal that the cultivation of cassava gives the highest average output of 4,515,620 metric tonnes and yield per hectare of 16.41 relative to other produce which affirms that Ogun State has the most comparative advantage in the cultivation of cassava followed by maize. The chapter further explores other pro-poor programmes directed at ensuring food security in the State.
Here is the link to the Book Chapter:

The Palgrave Handbook on Agricultural and Rural Development in Africa’
In brief, the book examines agricultural and rural development in Africa from theoretical, empirical and policy perspectives. It presents a robust discourse on the developmental concerns needed to be addressed in rural communities through agricultural transformation. It also emphasises on the significance of the agricultural sector as it is closely related to the issues of food sustainability, poverty reduction, employment creation, and the attainment of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Africa. Apart from the introduction and the conclusion chapters, the book contains 26 other chapters structured in five sections. The contributing authors provide the interconnections among the different aspects covered in the text, relating to agricultural and rural development in Africa. Hence, the book broadly recommends multiple evidence-based policies to develop the rural areas in Africa through the transformation of the agricultural sector that can benefit the continent.
Here is the link to the Handbook:

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